Search Results for “cauliflower”

October 20, 2011

Aggressively Vegetarian | Cauliflower “Steaks”

After nights of pierogies and mounds of mashed potatoes and roast chicken, I yearn for something light.  Almost ethereal.  This dinner is the lightest of light.   Nary a protein to be found.  Strictly vegetables.  And a bit of white chocolate.  What?

Tonight’s dinner took the oh-so-seasonal cauliflower and transformed that single veg into both a steak and a mash

read more »

Advertisements
March 1, 2013

It Makes a Difference | Askinosie Chocolate Tasting

Tasting SheetIt’s sometimes the unplanned moments that work out to be the best ones in your day.

Take the morning e-mail from a thoughtful Slow Food Columbus member who types a quick joke, makes you laugh and extends an invitation to attend a chocolate tasting with Shawn Askinosie in the Jeni’s Ice Cream Kitchens.

That afternoon.

Well, you have to say yes, don’t you?

I should say yes more often.

Especially when you’re saying yes to hear what Shawn Askinosie has to talk about.  Not only is he making remarkable chocolate that’s traceable from bean to bar, but he and his family are working hard to improve the lot of the farmers who grow the beans, the neighborhood and community in which the factory is located and heck, the lives of every single person who unwraps a bar of what I am starting to think is some of the best chocolate that has ever melted on my tongue.

Shawn takes something that inherently makes people happy – chocolate – and then ups the ante by making it good for everyone along the supply chain.  Good, clean and fair indeed.

His noble work takes him all around the world to the cocoa farmers and co-ops that he trades with directly who reside in that narrow band 20 degrees to the north and to the south of the equator.  There, in far flung locales from Ecuador to Tanzania to the Phillipines, Shawn partners, pays fairly and profit-shares with growers – many of them women – to produce not the rarest beans, but the ones handled with the greatest care.  Askinosie beans are carefully raised, picked, fermented and then sun-dried in the equatorial heat.

Don’t take my word that it’s these careful steps that makes Askinosie among the best chocolate made anywhere.  Listen to David Lebovitz.

read more »

March 8, 2012

Put It On (Just About) Anything | Daikon Radish Slaw

I’ll admit it: I am already greedily longing for spring and summer, despite the blissfully mild central Ohio winter we have had.

Forgive me.  I grew up in Texas.  And I’m almost certain tomatoes are already in season.  OK, that’s being dramatic.

But this daikon slaw somehow reminds me of summer.  And grilling outdoors.  And warm weather.  And love.

It’s simple to pull together from what has kept well during the still – quite seriously – dark days of winter.  Its Asian flavors make it interesting for topping a hot dog or snuggling up to a nice piece of pan-roasted fish.  It’s as fancy or homey as you want it to be.  Flexibility with flair.

And that tastes great any season of the year.

Pickled Daikon Radish Slaw

1 very large daikon radish, peeled and shredded

1 carrot, peeled and shredded

read more »

October 21, 2011

What to Serve with Steaks | Caramelized Shallots

I told you I’d have leftoversAnd on a Friday night, because that’s how we roll.

So after last night’s highly vegetarian dinner, I did feel like I needed a kick of iron.  A good piece of red meat.  Enter tonight’s steak, served with caramelized shallots and that fabulous leftover cauliflower.  I know.  Many of you are skeptical.  But trust me.   A very talented chef came up with that combo of white chocolate and cauliflower first.  Trust him.

PK’s Caramelized Shallots, Serves 2 (none for little Cherub, we meanies didn’t want to share tonight)

3 very large shallots, trimmed and thickly sliced

read more »

April 14, 2011

Chickpea Pangrattato | Gluten-Free Italian “Breadcrumbs”

I’ll admit a lack of comprehensive knowledge of  Celiac Disease, although some of my blogger friends suffer from it.  I know it is a terrible thing, leading to a lot of pain if you ingest gluten, which is in practically everything these days, due to cross contamination.  I can only imagine how hard it is to be as careful as you must while still loving food in all it’s glory.

I had a happy accident in the kitchen here recently, which lead me to this tasty discovery of a lovely, crunchy, garlicky substitute for one of my most favorite of Italian toppings: pangrattato.   It is a poor person’s substitute for Parmesan: usually leftover bread crumbs, toasted up in olive oil along with some garlic, salt and perhaps a smidge of chopped parsley.

Pangrattato, and now this clever mimic,  is heavenly sprinkled over (equally gluten-free) risotto.  I vow to make it a replacement topping for the cracker crumbs my Grandmother would fry in copious amounts of butter and smother cauliflower.  I am dreaming up ways to use it.  It is now protein, instead of carb, and one ingredient to the many that are in commercially produced breadcrumbs.  And to be honest, it makes me feel just a little smug with the chef-iness of it all.  A nice perk.

For a quick version, in a food processor, finely chop cooked, drained chickpeas, until they are the size of, you guessed it, breadcrumbs.  In a medium saute pan, add a tablespoon or two of good olive oil and a smashed clove of garlic.  Heat until shimmery.  Add the chickpeas and a bit of salt.  Fry for four to five minutes until a deep golden brown.  Drain on a paper towel-lined plate.  Allow to cool, then add in a tablespoon or less of chopped parsley and mix.  Top with roasted vegetables, risotto or anything you can dream up.

Playlist included Lovers in Japan, by Coldplay.

September 27, 2010

Brick Lane, Meet Persephone: A Seasonal, Weeknight Curry

Awww! Cherub is such a big help with chopping tomatoes. With a butter knife.

 

Indian food is something I’ve developed a taste for.  To the point that I crave it regularly.  I didn’t always.  I didn’t understand it; it was a little too exotic.  Now?  Let’s be honest here: I love it.  It has become a point of pride that I’ve tried to learn what I can about a world cuisine that 1.1 billion (with a B) eat every day.  

On Sunday, Hades, Cherub and I made a stop at the Sawmill Patel Brothers, the Indian supermarket, and worked up the ingredients for a lovely English-inspired vegetarian curry (it’s the heavy cream that makes it smack of something that Richard Hammond might enjoy after a few shouts at his local).  Cherub even helped pick out the 10 pound bag of Basmati rice that we ended up taking home.  Add in some seasonal baby eggplants and cauliflower, plus the last (I keep saying this) of the tomatoes from our garden.  Then a lovely melange of Indian spices from Patel to make it delicious.  

These two dishes require a bit of prep, but it’s totally worth the minor, and I do stress minor, effort. 

Lemon Basmati with Curried Eggplant and Cauliflower 

For the Lemon Basmati 

1 c. Basmati rice, soaked briefly in water 

2 c. water 

Salt 

While you’re doing prep for the rest of dinner, soak the rice in cold water.  When it’s time to get cooking, bring two cups of water to a boil and add in a generous sprinkling of salt.  Then tip in the drained rice, bring back to a boil and then reduce to the lowest setting to simmer slowly for about 15 minutes.  Turn off when done.  You will finish this in a frying pan just before the curry is ready. 

For the Curried Eggplant and Cauliflower 

The cauliflower breaks down significantly in the 30 minutes it cooks. Leave it initially in large chunks, so that you'll have some variety in size when it comes time to serve the dish.

 

1 bay leaf 

1 small red spicy pepper, whole 

1 black cardamom pod 

3 or 4 green cardamom pods 

1 t. cumin seed 

1 t. mustard seed 

1 red onion, chopped 

1 shallot, chopped 

1 garlic clove, minced 

1/2 inch fresh ginger root, finely grated 

5 or 6 baby eggplants, halved 

1 Japanese eggplant, sliced into rounds 

2 red skinned potatoes, cubed 

1 tomato, chopped 

1 heaping t. of curry 

1/2 t. garam masala 

2 c. water 

1/2 c. heavy cream 

Vegetable oil, salt, pepper (optional) 

In a pan heat a tablespoon or two of vegetable oil over medium high heat.  Add in bay through mustard seed and cook for one to two minutes, until browned.  Careful, the mustard seeds really pop.  If you have a screen to put over the pan, by all means, do it.  Then add in the onion and shallot.  Continue to cook over medium high heat for another two minutes, or until just beginning to brown.  Add in the garlic and the grated ginger.  Cook for 30 seconds.  Tip in eggplant through garam masala, cook for two minutes.  Add in the water.  Bring to a boil.  Reduce heat to medium and cook for 30 minutes.  Just before serving, reduce heat to low, add in the heavy cream and stir to incorporate. 

To finish the Basmati 

1/2 t. mustard seeds 

1/2 t. fenugreek seeds 

1/2 cumin seeds 

6 curry leaves 

2 green onions, sliced 

1/2 c chopped almonds 

1/2 lemon, zest and juice 

1/2 inch grated fresh turmeric root (1/2 t. dried turmeric will work just as well) 

1 generous pinch fresh coriander leaves, chopped for garnish 

In a large frying pan, heat 1 to 2 T. vegetable oil over medium high heat.  Add in the mustard, fenugreek and cumin seeds and the curry leaves.  Cook for one to two minutes, until browned.  Careful of the popping mustard seeds, cover with a lid or splatter screen.  Add in the green onions and almonds, cook for two minutes.  Mix the lemon zest, juice and fresh turmeric and pour in quickly and cook for 20 seconds.  Add in the cooked rice and stir to incorporate the seasonings.  Fry for two or three minutes to reheat. 

To serve, place generous servings of rice and curry in shallow plates, top with chopped coriander. 

Playlist included M.I.A’s Paper Planes.

%d bloggers like this: