Archive for ‘Beef’

April 12, 2011

Korean Short Ribs | Galbi Jijm

I’m always honored and humbled to cook food with such proud, venerable, even ancient roots.  Korean food is no exception.  Thousands of years of refinement has led to a breathtaking marriage of flavors.  This dish is a perfect example.  The sweet of the mirin joins the depth of the soy and the earthiness of the mushrooms for a bit of kitchen alchemy.  I compulsively tasted it as it simmered away, and I struggled to remember a more delicious sauce.  It was beautiful.

Again, its a recipe that takes a while, but there’s not a lot of hands-on time.  There are some moving parts at the end, but it is so – I repeat – so worth it.  It’s comforting, traditional, and special.  Those eating with you will feel loved.

Persephone’s Galbi Jijm

2 pounds of bone-in short rib

1 medium onion, roughly sliced

1 clove of garlic, diced

read more »

March 14, 2011

Irish Cooking | Gaelic Steak

Steaks are the ultimate in quick cooking.  Fifteen minutes and dinner can be on the table.  Plus if you’re feeling a little sluggish, maybe you need a little more iron, or perhaps a Guinness.  Tonight’s Gaelic version was topped with sauteed onions, watercress and a whiskey reduction.  This is a wonderful combination, perhaps the best way to eat a steak, and like the Guinness it goes so well with, it gives you strength.

Gaelic Steak, Serves 3, Inspired by The Scottish Irish Pub and Hearth Cookbook

1 one pound rib steak

2T butter

read more »

January 24, 2011

Puffy Tacos | Leftover Brisket Part 3: Son of Braised Brisket

This is a seriously regional favorite.  So seriously regional that much of Texas won’t even know what these are.  Only the folks from San Antonio will smile knowingly and nod their head, saying, “Yes.  Puffy tacos.  We go way back.”  San Antonians love their puffy tacos.  So much so that the local minor league baseball team The Missions has a secondary mascot: a puffy taco.  PK tip: A bizzare seventh inning stretch tradition involves a small child that circles the bases in furious pursuit of the taco.  They almost always manage to tackle the taco just before the it reaches home.  Good times. I keep telling you to visit.

Some say they were originally created at Henry’s in San Antonio.  It’s different from a regular taco in the sense that the raw masa tortilla is simply fried, not griddled then fried as in most gordita, taco and chalupa shells.  The resulting shell is, well, puffy.  And delicious.  And like no other taco you can buy anywhere outside San Antonio.  You know you’re curious.  Go on, fire up that fryer.

N.I.O.S.A. Puffy Tacos, serves 4

For the filling:

Last bit of that braised brisket, about 3/4 pound, shredded, not chopped

1 T chile powder

2 T cumin (or comino, people)

1/2 c homemade chicken, beef or vegetable stock, otherwise use water.  Really.

read more »

January 23, 2011

Braised Brisket Part Deux | Beef Siomai, Daikon Salad

A trip to an Asian market is so heavenly.  Those markets are filled to the brim with flavor and inspiration.  My favorite Japanese shop is Tensuke Market.  It’s where I get my yuzu and some of the most delicious soy sauce ever.  It’s where you can pick up really fresh sushi, and carefully crafted bento boxes.  It’s also where I found the shumai wrappers for today’s Philippine siomai.

The Japanese don’t typically fill shumai with beef, but it’s common in the Philippines.  So with a little nod to a couple of different cultures, I wound up with a really tasty appetizer that’s a snap to assemble and serve thanks to the leftover brisket.

Beef Siomai, makes 28

3/4 pound leftover braised brisket, very finely chopped

2 inch piece of ginger, finely grated

2 green onions, finely sliced

1 heaping t of miso paste

read more »

January 19, 2011

Globetrotter | Braised Brisket

Sometimes, the heavens align to make my cooking for the week a little easier.  Enter the brisket.  Such a great cut and so flexible.

Sidenote: I’m in serious trouble if Zeus is reading this post, because in the country I was raised, brisket can be prepared one way only.  Small exceptions are made one day out of the year – March 17th – when it is acceptable to consume corned beef.

A brisket is a great, inexpensive cut of meat that’s superbly tender if it’s been given some low and slow cooking (just like bbq, y’all).  And if you cook a really big piece of meat one day, you are left with the lovely proposition of leftovers.

Tonight, this simply-braised brisket was served in generous slabs lacquered with the cooking liquids.  Partnering it was a silken parsnip and potato puree and the world’s greatest (hyperbole, perhaps) spiced purple cabbage.  A bit like a dinner in Alsace.

The excess brisket will be the base of two more days of worldly deliciousness.  Look later this week for recipes in which the leftovers will be dressed up in tight Mexican Mariachi pants and a big hat and then subsequently looking demure in a separate Philippine dish.  Globetrotting indeed.

Simple Long-Braised Brisket

1 – 3 pound  brisket

1/2 onion, chopped

2 carrots, scrubbed and cut in thirds

6 cloves garlic (I used some garlic confit that was in the fridge – you don’t have to, of course)

read more »

January 11, 2011

Winter Kitchen | White Bolognese with Fresh Pasta

You can’t find a fresh, ripe, beautiful red tomato here in Ohio in January.  You just can’t.  So how could you possibly make a bolognese in the depths of winter?  Make a white bolognese.  Skip the tomatoes altogether and make a very Italian specialty.  In doing so, you will make my single most favorite thing to cook.

It is my most favorite of all favorites.  Really, truly.  The kind that my small family of three will piggishly devour an entire pound of pasta, with Cherub (remember, she’s three) helping herself to thirds.  It is, in a word, delicious.  Amazingly delicious.  Well, that’s two.  But I mean it: if you have yet to make a recipe from this blog, you should make this one.

White Bolognese, adapted from The Silver Spoon

1 T olive oil

2 strips of bacon

1/2 finely chopped yellow onion

read more »

November 19, 2010

Dinner at The Buena Vista Social Club | Braised Tri-tip

So when you’re gone most of the day, you need something that you can stick in the oven on a really low heat, or perhaps in the crock pot, if that’s your weapon of choice.  A tri-tip roast is your answer.  It’s an inexpensive cut that I’ve found works beautifully with Cuban flavors.  It can stand to be braised for a good while.  Because there are only two per cow, they may not be behind your butcher’s window – so just ask.  Today, the roast was cooked along with a combination of peppers, onions and carrot, which was later pureed and turned into a lovely sauce that pulled the whole dish together.  Served with a sunchoke and cassava mash and a few fried plantains, this is a sturdy meal for a chilly night.  Familiar, but with a little bit of newness to keep your interest piqued.  Just like a first date.

Cuban Tri-tip, Sunchoke and Cassava Mash with Fried Plantains, serves 4

3  pounds tri-tip

1  jalapeno (all of it, seeds and everything) stem cut off and cut in quarters

read more »

%d bloggers like this: