Archive for ‘Bread’

September 22, 2011

Farewell, Summer Garden | Gazpacho

Every so often you run across a recipe that begs to be made just as is, such as Spanish maestro José Andrés’s recipe for gazpacho.  Not a more perfect dish than this can be found to send summer off into its nine month hiatus.  Celebrate all that we are losing before the clock strikes 5:05 a.m. tomorrow.  Well, perhaps this post is a bit late for that, but rustle up some of these ingredients this weekend for a quick, albeit belated, goodbye.

I used some gorgeous, juicy yellow tomatoes from a Green B.E.A.N. Delivery box along with peppers and cucumbers from my back yard.  All gone now.

Don’t cry because it’s over.  Smile because it happened.

Playlist included Quiet Town, by Josh Rouse.

June 20, 2011

Strawberry Week | Panzanella Salad

This past weekend, Cherub and I, along with some Slow Food Columbus members and friends descended upon Schacht Farm Market for the last weekend of you-pick strawberries.  I left with ten pounds.  Ten pounds.

I knew there would be jam, cobblers and desserts in store, but I wanted some for lunch.  And it wasn’t like I had to worry if there would be enough.  There were obviously plenty.

I quickly cobbled together a strawberry panzanella salad that just hit the spot after a morning’s work of picking.  It didn’t hurt that we had a bit of past its prime ciabatta that made the base. And growing the in back yard is plenty of basil, parsley and mint.  I sliced up some green onions I’d picked up at the farmer’s market, although I do prefer and adore red onion in this salad.  As for a dressing, a generous drizzling of balsamic vinegar and olive oil, few twists of pepper and a pinch of salt are all you need, lemon if you have it.  And of course the berries.  Lots of those.

Strawberry Panzanella Salad, Serves two (plus a little four year old)

2 c slightly stale bread, cut into large cubes (I used ciabatta)

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March 16, 2011

Irish Cooking | Pint Glass Bread

I am woefully unskilled as a bread baker.  I’ve just not managed a beautiful, yeasty bread that is photo-worthy.

I love the Irish for giving me an alternative that is so easy, Cherub does most of the measuring.  All you need is a pint glass, a bowl and a sheet pan.  Really.

Pint Glass Bread, makes one loaf, Inspired by The Country Cooking of Ireland

1 pint glass of all purpose flour

1 pint glass of whole wheat flour (mine was stone ground from Flying J Farm)

Salt to cover the bottom of a pint glass

Soda to cover the bottom of a pint glass

Butter to cover the bottom of a pint glass

Buttermilk to fill 3/4 of a pint glass

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.  In a large bowl combine well the  flours, salt and soda.  Add in the butter and rub between your fingers to create small pebbles.  Add buttermilk and mix with your hands until it becomes a soft ball of dough.  Pat out into a large round two inches thick.  Place on a baking sheet and bake for 45 to 60 minutes or until the loaf sounds hollow when knocked on the bottom.

Serve with copious amounts of homemade Snowville Creamery butter while it’s still warm.

Playlist included Falling Slowly by The Swell Season.

Little dough-coated hands proudly display their work.

 

November 3, 2010

Locavore | Gretna and Strawberry Salad

Those local strawberries from Crum Strawberry Farm are all gone.  The same goes for the beautiful arugula and salad mix from Honeyrun Farm.  They both went quickly this week between Hades and I into this surprisingly seasonal salad that also features Blue Jacket Dairy‘s Gretna, a Halloumi-style cheese (so local! so delicious!).  Blue Jacket recommends that you slice the Gretna and brown it quickly on both sides in a hot frying pan.  But for this salad, I prefer to allow slices to completely melt and go all brown and thin and lacy, then spread it on a toasted piece of artisan bread.  The cheesy crispy toast is the perfect foil to the spicy arugula and the last of the sweet berries.

Gretna and Strawberry Salad, serves 2

10 to 12 medium strawberries, hulled and quartered

4 or 5 quarter-inch slices of Blue Jacket Dairy Gretna

2 slices of good quality artisan bread, toasted

2 very generous handfuls of mixed salad greens, including arugula

Olive oil, balsamic vinegar, honey, good quality French Dijon mustard, salt, pepper

Heat a small nonstick frying pan over medium heat; spread the slices of Gretna evenly in the pan.  Allow to melt completely flat and begin to brown and fry.  Divide the cheese between the two slices of toast and spread to coat evenly.  Return to the pan, cheese side down for a few second to brown a bit more if you like.

In a large salad bowl, mix four tablespoons of olive oil, one tablespoon of balsamic, one tablespoon of honey, one teaspoon Dijon mustard and salt and pepper to taste.  Add in the greens and toss to combine.  PK tip: don’t dress the salad too early, just before serving, no one likes wilty, soggy lettuce.  Divide between two large plates, top with the berries.  Snug up the cheesy toast along side the salad.  Say farewell to fall and summer.

Playlist included The Writer, by Ellie Goulding.

October 25, 2010

Party Snack: Posh Squash

Sunday I (well, mostly Cherub) gathered some locally-grown pumpkins and squashes at a nearby u-pick farm.  Since nearly everyone has a gourd or two lying around this time of year, I thought I’d give you some ideas about how you might use them.  One minute they’re seasonal decorations on your front porch and the next you’re serving them to party guests.  Result!

Today, I used one of those squashes, the demure Carnival, for a posh little party snack.  Tonight’s do was hosted by my friend Elpis, and as I’m sure you’re aware, party season is upon us.  These nibbles are easy and sure to please, so add this recipe to your arsenal.

The basics are roasted squash, pancetta, parmesan and buttery toast.  You can go two ways with this one: quick and dirty or overacheiver.  I opted for the overacheiver version for your viewing pleasure, and to encourage you to do the same. 

Roasted Carnival Squash Nibbles with Pancetta and Parmesan

1 Carnival squash, peeled, deseeded and cut into large-ish cubes

Olive oil, salt, pepper

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October 11, 2010

Tomato Bread Soup

I’ve been in an Italian mood lately.  One of the things that’s been encouraging this is a cookbook I hadn’t pulled down in a while: Flavors of Tuscany, by Nancy Harmon Jenkins.  There is a real difference in Italian cooking and Italian-American cooking.  There is an ease to these Italian recipes: many can be served hot or room temperature, which is tremendously helpful if you’re budgeting your time.

Last night, I made a pappa al pomodoro with Roma tomatoes from Wishwell Farm and the leftover ciabatta from Omega in North Market.   I also used carrots and a celeriac that I picked up on Friday at the Pearl Alley Farmers Market.  All this local produce simply prepared made for a lovely meal.  The soup is a thick one, almost like a porridge.  We served it fairly warm, but I can see making this mid-summer and placing it in a cool pantry before serving it.

Pappa al Pomodoro, inspired from Flavors of Tuscany

2 pounds fresh tomatoes, cut in chunks

1 medium yellow onion, peeled and coarsely chopped

1 medium carrot, coarsely chopped

1 small celeriac, peeled and coarsely chopped

4 or 5 sprigs parsley

Salt and pepper

1/4 cup olive oil

2 garlic cloves, peeled and chopped

1/2 pound slightly stale ciabatta, or other country bread, in small slices

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