Archive for ‘Milk’

September 28, 2011

A New Southern Favorite | Green Grits

I am currently hoarding the last of my Nora Mill Granary yellow speckled grits.  These stone milled grits are honestly the best I’ve ever tasted.  My favorite way to make them is with half stock and half Snowville whole milk; then stir in a few pureed greens, anything that’s seasonal, even lettuces are lovely.

And do I need anything to go with them?  Not really.  But if you have a bit of a fresh ham that you’ve brined and baked, that’d go just beautifully.

Green Grits, Serves 4 to 6, Inspired by original recipe in Jamie’s America

2 c stock, chicken or vegetable, preferably homemade

2 c whole milk, Snowville, if it’s available in your area

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September 7, 2011

Curds and Whey, Two Ways

Something has been stirring in me to make some more ricotta.  It’s so easy, you know every ingredient that goes in it (milk, salt, lemon), and there’s such satisfaction in making your own cheese.  I have, however, been distressed every time I’ve made it that I have so much whey left over after the curds separate out.  I mean honestly.  The cows at Snowville are such beautiful productive girls, how could I carelessly dump half of that milk down the drain?

I happily came across this great recipe for whey crêpes that are the most delicious ones I’ve ever had that weren’t made by a French person.  They are staggeringly good. 

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May 8, 2011

Mother’s Day at Pleasantview Farm | Asparagus with Shallots

Mother’s Day afternoon was spent just how I wanted it: out at a gorgeous farm, with good food, family and friends.  Pleasantview Farm is twenty miles outside of Columbus, but feels a world away.  The farm is quiet with vast expanses of meadow and sky.  A working organic dairy farm, it is home to a great many head of beautiful dairy cows and their adorable offspring.

Since it was a potluck, I brought along an easy asparagus salad that was drizzled with a mustard dressing just before serving (a Ball jar works great for this).  It was an easy, no fuss day.  Perfect for Mother’s Day.

Asparagus Salad with Shallots, serves plenty at a potluck

2 pounds asparagus, stringy ends removed

1 thick slice of pancetta, cut into 1/4 inch dice

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March 14, 2011

Irish Cooking | Quick Scallop Soup

In addition to being in love with Indian cuisine, English cuisine, Spanish cuisine, Mexican cuisine, Japanese cuisine and – I’m sensing a pattern here – all manner of cuisines, I figured it’d be a kindness to share a few Irish recipes that I love as well, in honor of St. Patrick’s Day.

This cream of scallop soup took nearly no time to cook (easy enough for lunch), had just a few ingredients (many already in the pantry and fridge) and tasted deliciously complex.  I’m banking on that it was the anchovies.

Yes, I know, you told me last time, you don’t like anchovies.  But here I am again, giving you another recipe that uses them and telling you, you’ll like it.  It’s delicious.  As my bowl was being licked clean, it occurred to me, that this soup base is fantastic for all manner of seafood; lobster would be equally at home here.  It would also serve as a perfect broth for a few potatoes and clams for a clam chowder.

Cream of Scallop Soup, Serves 3, Inspired by The Scottish-Irish Pub and Hearth Cookbook

1/2 pound small bay scallops

2 T butter

2 T onions, minced

1 1/2 T flour

3 c whole milk (I used Snowville, since the milk is crucial in this recipe)

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February 17, 2011

It’s Really Just An Excuse | Buttermilk Pancakes

So with all the crème fraiche lying around, I was bound to make some more butter, and with that comes the buttermilk and with that, well, Cherub wanted pancakes.  I can’t say no to her sweet little face.  Well, I can sometimes.  OK, a lot of times.  But today is a yes kind of day.  So fresh buttermilk pancakes for lunch?  You got it little sister.

And for me?  It’s really just an excuse to eat more butter.  Besides, Warren says it’s good for me.

Buttermilk Pancakes, inspired by James Beard’s recipe in American Cookery

2 c all-purpose flour

1 1/4 t baking soda

1 t salt

3 T sugar

2 c buttermilk (homemade, if you can)

3 eggs, seperated

2 t vanilla

1/4 c butter, melted

Whisk the flour, baking soda, salt and sugar together in a large bowl.  Whisk together the buttermilk, egg yolks and vanilla.  Add and mix well with the dry ingredients.  Beat in the butter and mix until smooth.  Beat the egg whites until they have stiff peaks, then fold into the batter gently.

Ladle the batter into a hot pan or griddle and cook until the edges of the pancake are just starting to dry, most of the bubbles on top have popped and the bottom is golden brown.  Flip and brown the other side.

Serve with all that Snowville Creamery butter and some good Ohio maple syrup.  Speaking of which, fresh batches of syrup will available March 5th at Flying J Farm at the annual Maple Sugaring event.  Bring the kids for a demonstration on how syrup is made and stay for a pancake lunch.

Playlist included Thirteen, by Big Star.

 

 

February 15, 2011

Snowville Creamery | Making Crème Fraiche

A little kitchen magic. After 24 hours, thick creme fraiche pours from the heavy cream container.

Slow Food Columbus recently held a free (yes! it was free!) workshop at the North Market as part of their taste education efforts.  It was so wonderful to see a room full of folks eager to learn how to make their own butter.   Warren Taylor, a.k.a., the Dairy Evangelist, lead the class and was a fireball of energy and information.  I learned the differences between the milk produced by the beautiful grass fed ladies Snowville cares for and the product from more intensive methods.  I learned about the difference between pasteurization and ultra high temperature (UHT) pasteurization (Why is UHT milk slightly sweet? Because it starts to caramelize at that high temperature. Eek).  Warren even convinced me to switch from skim to whole.  (I’ll move up to 2% first, but I’m doing it.)

But not only did I learn the difference between sweet cream and cultured cream butters (and made them) but I also learned something tremendous: how to make crème fraiche.  Oh yes.

Here’s how:

1 cup of cultured buttermilk

1/2 gallon heavy cream

Mix the two.  In Snowville’s carton, there’s enough room for you to add in the buttermilk and shake it to mix.  Let it sit on the counter for 24 hours.  Voilà ! Crème fraiche.  Refrigerate until ready to use.

Then to make cultured butter, pour some of this crème fraiche into a food processor (no higher than the liquid fill line) and flip on.  Process until the butter separates from the buttermilk (it will happen rather suddenly).  Using your hands squeeze out all the buttermilk from the butter (do this over a bowl and save that buttermilk for pancakes or coleslaw dressing), then rinse the butter under cold water until it runs clear (it keeps longer if you do this).

Fun fact: If you make butter from heavy cream, the liquid you press out is not buttermilk, it’s skim milk!  Who knew?

Keep an eye out for crème fraiche in tonight’s dinner.  It’s divine.

Thank you Warren Taylor.  We love Snowville.  We love your pasture grazed cows.  We love their fresh milk and the heavenly cream that rises to the top.

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