Posts tagged ‘Christmas’

December 24, 2011

Merry Christmas

May all your Christmas wishes come true.

Linens from great grandma, dishes from an aunt and uncle, glassware from mother-in-law, antique ornaments from Grandmother, antique ball jars from a Twitter friend, food from our kitchen.  (Plus cute clementine place card holders for whimsy.)  I love a meaningful table.

Playlist included I’ll Be Home for Christmas, by the Carpenters.

December 27, 2010

Christmas Leftovers | Pear, Stilton and Roast Goose Quesadillas

This was the first year I had goose for Christmas.  The first time I’d had goose, full stop.  Goose is the delicious flavor baby of turkey crossed with roast beef.  FabulousRhea roasted it, we brought truffles for shaving over the top.  The next day, we stole took the leftovers home and whipped up this yummy quesadilla with a bit of leftover Stilton and some of the thinly sliced pears that I had used for the Christmas Eve centerpiece (NOT a tablescape, people.  Never a tablescape.)  PK tip: For my quesadillas (even the “normal” ones with shredded cheddar and red onions), I don’t ever oil or butter the pan.  Just about all recipes out there tell you to do it.  But you really don’t have to.  And I’m originally from Texas, so I’ve made and eaten a lot of quesadillas in my time.  Trust me.

Quesadilla with Pear, Stilton and Roast Goose, serves 2

4 flour tortillas

1 very ripe pear, cored, thinly sliced (I used Bosc)

1/2 c shredded roast goose

1/3 c crumbled Stilton

Crème fraiche or sour cream for serving

In a pan over medium heat or on a hot griddle, place two tortillas and divide ingredients evenly between the two: pear, goose and Stilton.  Top each with a second tortilla.  Heat until just beginning to crisp and brown.  Flip carefully and brown the opposite side.

Slide onto a cutting board and slice into four quarters.  Serve with crème fraiche or sour cream.

Playlist included Drumming Song by Florence + The Machine.


 

 

 

 

December 27, 2010

Christmas Menu | A Recap

Christmas was a Cronus and Rhea’s and it was marvelous.

Twice-Stuffed Roast Goose with Truffles and Pan Gravy, Stuffing of Sausage, Stuffing of Onions, Apples and Prunes

Braised Spiced Red Cabbage

Roasted Brussels Sprouts with Pancetta

Yorkshire Pudding with Carrots and Broccoli

Pear Salad with Stilton and Walnuts

Dense Chocolate Sour Cream Bundt with Raspberry Puree, made by the lovely Amphitrite

A bit later today, I’ll post a quick,  light supper recipe using the leftovers.

If you want any more details about the menu or recipes, just let me know.

November 29, 2010

Giveaway of the Day | Heart of the Artichoke Cookbook

If you are or know a food lover, this is the Christmas gift.  Really. 

The Heart of the Artichoke, by David Tanis, is beautifully written and photographed.  Much like those showpiece cookbooks that you will probably never cook from.  But the true beauty of this book lies in its practicality.  Co-Chef at Chez Panisse, Tanis’s cooking is the epitome of seasonality married to simplicity.  His charming and unassuming personality shines through from the very start of the book.   Yes, he cooks at the most loved and famous restaurant in the country.  But here’s how he cooks at home. 

I was near tears so pleased to see him crystallize something I have been trying to convey for sometime here in the Kitchen.  You have time to cook.  “mesmerized by television shows hyping the thirty-minute meal and the blood sport of competitive cooking, we have somehow forgotten the pleasure of giving ourselves over to the true kitchen experience.  This doesn’t mean spending hours and hours in the kitchen.  It’s not more difficult cooking, but a different way of engaging with food.  What matters is the joy.” 

The book begins with personal food rituals that Tanis holds dear, from peeling an apple in one long curvaceous strip, to his methodic way of enjoying oatmeal (I have a similar quirk with French toast, ask me about it sometime), to the perfect simple meal of beans (lovely Italian white beans) on toast.

It is a very intimate and throughly engaging book with each menu beginning with a story of its origins.  You can sit and read this book.  And when you do, you want to make these dishes.  All of them.  I can’t tell you how much pleasure I’ve gotten out of my copy already.  It will be a well-loved treasure.

Would you like a copy?  Of course you would.  You’re dying for one.  To win one, in the comments section of this post, or in a tweet, tell me what is your favorite cookbook?  You have until Tuesday, November 30, at noon to submit your entry.  The winner will be chosen randomly using Random.org.  For full giveaway rules, click here.  Good luck, my dear readers.  I hope you win!

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