Posts tagged ‘fall’

December 6, 2010

Snowy Night | Warm Cabbage Salad with Simple Cod

Since I’ll be headed to warmer climes tomorrow to visit Demeter and Zeus in Texas, the next few posts will have a different feel.  Texas is famed, after all, for being “A whole ‘nother country”.  Posts will more than likely contain things such as enchiladas, nachos, margaritas, brisket and Shiner.  The stuff that still kind of runs through my veins as a Texas girl.  Good times, dear readers, real good times.

In anticipation of that, I made some fish for dinner tonight.  Zeus already snickered when I told him that I had vegetarian Indian food on Sunday. “Ha!  We don’t eat a lotta veggies down here.  We eat meat!”  I know Daddy.

Tonight’s cod was simply prepared and served alongside a seasonal, warm cabbage salad with mushrooms, shallots, and some crispy prosciutto which becomes delicate and almost glass-like when fried.  To boost the vegetable portion of the dinner, I roasted thin disks of potato and turnip.  Drizzled over all of this was a mustard and ume plum vinaigrette.

Simple Cod with Warm Cabbage Salad, Ume Plum Vinaigrette

3/4 pound cod

2 to 3 thin slices prosciutto, chopped

3 ounces mushrooms, minced

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November 3, 2010

Locavore | Gretna and Strawberry Salad

Those local strawberries from Crum Strawberry Farm are all gone.  The same goes for the beautiful arugula and salad mix from Honeyrun Farm.  They both went quickly this week between Hades and I into this surprisingly seasonal salad that also features Blue Jacket Dairy‘s Gretna, a Halloumi-style cheese (so local! so delicious!).  Blue Jacket recommends that you slice the Gretna and brown it quickly on both sides in a hot frying pan.  But for this salad, I prefer to allow slices to completely melt and go all brown and thin and lacy, then spread it on a toasted piece of artisan bread.  The cheesy crispy toast is the perfect foil to the spicy arugula and the last of the sweet berries.

Gretna and Strawberry Salad, serves 2

10 to 12 medium strawberries, hulled and quartered

4 or 5 quarter-inch slices of Blue Jacket Dairy Gretna

2 slices of good quality artisan bread, toasted

2 very generous handfuls of mixed salad greens, including arugula

Olive oil, balsamic vinegar, honey, good quality French Dijon mustard, salt, pepper

Heat a small nonstick frying pan over medium heat; spread the slices of Gretna evenly in the pan.  Allow to melt completely flat and begin to brown and fry.  Divide the cheese between the two slices of toast and spread to coat evenly.  Return to the pan, cheese side down for a few second to brown a bit more if you like.

In a large salad bowl, mix four tablespoons of olive oil, one tablespoon of balsamic, one tablespoon of honey, one teaspoon Dijon mustard and salt and pepper to taste.  Add in the greens and toss to combine.  PK tip: don’t dress the salad too early, just before serving, no one likes wilty, soggy lettuce.  Divide between two large plates, top with the berries.  Snug up the cheesy toast along side the salad.  Say farewell to fall and summer.

Playlist included The Writer, by Ellie Goulding.

October 27, 2010

Kitchen Magic: Local Squash Soufflé and a Steak

A soufflé?  On a Wednesday?  Why yes!  Of course.  You know why?  Shhhh.  Because there were leftovers.

Yesterday’s roasted Hubbard squash risotto meant that there was a whole half (ha!) of a squash leftover, which amounted to about 2/3 of a cup of pulp.  I had every intention of fixing something else entirely for dinner tonight, but at the store, I couldn’t find what I needed.  Some nice looking steaks were on sale, and we had the squash from yesterday, so I figured I could come up with something.  I told you I would.  I just didn’t want to let you down.

Soufflés sound all difficult and daunting and well, they kind of are all you’ve ever read about.  Like any good prima-donna, soufflés have a long contract rider with demands such as

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October 24, 2010

Fall Sunday in Ohio

 

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October 13, 2010

Juniper Rubbed Sirloin with Balsamic Dressed Potatoes

Weeknight meals aren’t super complicated around here.  That doesn’t mean they have to be the same old boring flavors that make you want to tear your hair out.  Ok, maybe that’s just me that gets worked up like that.  But I digress.  Today I’m not going to give you so much of a recipe as

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October 6, 2010

“Eat at a Locally-Minded Restaurant”: Let’s go to Skillet!

A great suggestion for one of the things you can do to participate in local foods week is eat at a “locally-minded” restaurant.  So to make sure we touched as many points on the Eat Local Challenge Pledge Card as we could this week, my family visited the cheerful Caskey family at Skillet for lunch today.  Even home-body Persephone loves a good meal out.  

Hades started with the Red Beans and Rice.  Chef Kevin Caskey really nailed the smokey, French Quarter flavor of this creole classic.  Sadly, we dug in too quickly and have no photo to prove its existence.

Mommy told Cherub the grilled cheese was a real winner.  So she ordered the grilled cheese and pumpkin and black bean soup for herself (she’s a very confident three-year-old).    

While we have worked hard to make sure she tries all types of foods with different flavors and textures, I have to say, I was shocked to see how much soup she vacuumed up.  Then I tasted it.  Well, of course.  It’s a fantastic combination: silky pumpkin with perfectly cooked and seasoned black beans.  What’s not to love?

I am no stranger to Flying J Farms beef.  It’s some of the best we’ve tasted.  I had to order the Diner Burger: made with ground beef from Flying J Farm‘s grass-fed and finished cows, on grilled brioche, topped with fontina,  a fried egg and peppery arugula.  The egg still had a delicious thick yolkiness, that  further “sauced” the burger (and my shirt, since Persephone is nothing if not a graceful eater).  It was tremendously good.  But what really set it off was the lovely tomato marmalade.  In a word: finesse. 

Hades ordered the Fried Green Tomato BLT, topped with a fried yard egg, a pretty ruffle of frisee and oo-wee sauce.  Let me tell you: oo-wee, it’s good sauce and a good sandwich.  I think fried green tomatoes can be kind of pain to do right.  And Chef Caskey does them right.  Nice, thick, meaty tomato (you can easily screw them up and make them mushy, not so here), along with thick, meaty bacon made a wonderful fare-the-well to summer sandwich.

Both Hades and I had small sides of different, but perfectly paired, potato salads.  His a homestyle and mine a cold German-style. 

All sandwiches were $9.  Not much for locally sourced, creatively conceived and downright delicious fare.

I really do love this restaurant.  It’s the kind of place that if we go out, which is rarely, we want to go here.  Make sure you visit them this week.

October 4, 2010

Weekday Apple Salad

I couldn’t help myself.  In light of Saturday’s article in the WSJ, saying bacon is singing its swan song, I defiantly made a tasty fall salad with bacon ends from Curly Tail Farm.  I can’t help it if it goes so well with fall apples from Gillogly Orchards and sharp cheddar from Ohio Farm Direct and a few spicy mustard greens from Honeyrun Farm.  I. just. can’t. help it.

Combine those ingredients in the quantities you like (I like lots of greens, lots of apples, a little bit of cheddar and a little bit more bacon).  Then dress it in a vinaigrette made from apple cider vinegar, Hays apple cider, olive oil, salt, pepper, and just a drop or two of sriracha.

Cherub ate a local version of mac and cheese: some of the leftover Mrs. Miller’s Homemade noodles from last night’s chicken, along with a quick bechamel (equal parts flour and butter in a small saucepan, heated until bubbly for a minute or two, then whisk in Snowville milk to make a sauce) then add in a few ounces of cheese mixing to melt.  Add noodles to sauce and voila!  Scratch mac and cheese in under ten minutes.

See the Farms and Producers page for complete sourcing.

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