Posts tagged ‘Flour’

September 3, 2011

Extra Time on Saturday | Pasta and Focaccia

The quick and dirty version of a Saturday dinner:

Because I made a veal stock today (with lovely bones from Bluescreek Farm Meats), it meant that there was quite a bit of tasty meat left on the bones after the stock was all said and done.  It was dropped into the quick tomato sauce, that I seem to make quite a bit here in the summer.  (It’s just now about time for the last of those tasty orbs.  Get them fresh while you still can.)  This was poured over some homemade tagliatelle.

Served alongside for sopping up all the extra tomato-y goodness was a bit of rosemary focaccia: (1 1/4 c all purpose flour, 1 large sprig fresh rosemary finely chopped, 3/4 t salt, 1 package dried yeast, 1/2 c water all dumped into a bread machine for kneading, then allowed to rise in a covered and very generously olive-oiled bowl for about an hour an a half; punched down on a baking tray and allowed to rise once again for about 30 minutes and then drizzled with more olive oil and torn rosemary, salt and grated parm; baked at 400F for about 25 minutes).  A simpler, no knead version is here.

Playlist included Misery, by New Jersey’s Big Troubles.  How is it that My Bloody Valentine is now retro?  Are we that old?  Le sigh.

April 6, 2011

A Shared Experience | Falafel

We’ve all been to the takeaway on a Friday or Saturday night in our blissful, hungry, after-the-pub or rock show moments.  We’ve all hit the kebab stand or the middle eastern place in the middle of the night.  As we stand cradling the foil wrapped object of our desire, cucumber sauce dripping down our chins, mouth full of onion, falafel, and tahini, we mumble to our friends, “This is so good!  Why do I only have this when I’m drunk after the bar?”

As it turns out, you can recreate this shared food experience at home, because it’s pretty easy.  Not only do you not have to precook the beans, there’s not even really a recipe to it.  Feel like including some parsley?  Do it.  Don’t have any onion?  Skip it.

Simply soak some chickpeas in water over night, drain and tip into a food processor.  Add in any combination of ground cumin, ground

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March 16, 2011

Irish Cooking | Pint Glass Bread

I am woefully unskilled as a bread baker.  I’ve just not managed a beautiful, yeasty bread that is photo-worthy.

I love the Irish for giving me an alternative that is so easy, Cherub does most of the measuring.  All you need is a pint glass, a bowl and a sheet pan.  Really.

Pint Glass Bread, makes one loaf, Inspired by The Country Cooking of Ireland

1 pint glass of all purpose flour

1 pint glass of whole wheat flour (mine was stone ground from Flying J Farm)

Salt to cover the bottom of a pint glass

Soda to cover the bottom of a pint glass

Butter to cover the bottom of a pint glass

Buttermilk to fill 3/4 of a pint glass

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.  In a large bowl combine well the  flours, salt and soda.  Add in the butter and rub between your fingers to create small pebbles.  Add buttermilk and mix with your hands until it becomes a soft ball of dough.  Pat out into a large round two inches thick.  Place on a baking sheet and bake for 45 to 60 minutes or until the loaf sounds hollow when knocked on the bottom.

Serve with copious amounts of homemade Snowville Creamery butter while it’s still warm.

Playlist included Falling Slowly by The Swell Season.

Little dough-coated hands proudly display their work.

 

October 7, 2010

Real Buttermilk Pancakes

After making several batches of butter this week (I keep telling you it’s really easy), I was left with several cups of buttermilk. 

Since I had more time yesterday morning, I made a big batch of buttermilk pancakes for Cherub.  I used whole wheat flour from Flying J Farm, home churned butter, Holistic Acres eggs and all that Snowville buttermilk. 

I used James Beard’s recipe from his American Cookery book, but added a little sugar, bumped up the soda just a bit and it needed a bit more flour (all purpose white) because homemade buttermilk is thinner than the cultured you’d get in the store. 

We’re not normally a whole wheat flour kind of a family, but these were really delicious.  They came out fluffy and with a nice texture from the whole wheat.  Cover them with lovely Ohio maple syrup and you’re laughin’.  Cherub devoured them and we still have nice leftovers for school mornings like this one.  You could even freeze them.

Try some this weekend.

Only non-local ingredients were baking soda, salt and granulated sugar.  For complete sourcing see the Farms and Producers page.

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