Posts tagged ‘Milk’

October 24, 2011

Final Harvest | Corn Milk Soup

It’s simply the best of the last of the garden.  Eight ears of the last of the sweet corn.  Cobs scraped completely clean, releasing all that sweet corn “milk.”  I think it’s what makes this soup special.

But perhaps, too, it’s that I added in the last few peppers still standing on my counter.  Another handful of tomatoes that were picked green in the back garden, but managed to ripen despite that deep insult.  And green onions picked up at the farmer’s market.  Plus two palmfuls of teeny purple potatoes (that were a growing experiment by me) from a more experienced gardener friend.  Generous pinches of fresh thyme from the terracotta pot on the patio.  Twists of pepper.  A blessing of salt.

Poach a few shrimp in the hot soup to make it more substantial.  Or some smoked haddock would be perfectly at home.  Or if you have leftovers, top bowls of soup with a crumbled a link of andouille and some sauteed shrimp for a take on a gumbo.  That’s what I’m going to do.

Corn Milk Soup, serves 6 to 8

4 strips bacon, sliced

2 green onions, thinly sliced

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September 28, 2011

A New Southern Favorite | Green Grits

I am currently hoarding the last of my Nora Mill Granary yellow speckled grits.  These stone milled grits are honestly the best I’ve ever tasted.  My favorite way to make them is with half stock and half Snowville whole milk; then stir in a few pureed greens, anything that’s seasonal, even lettuces are lovely.

And do I need anything to go with them?  Not really.  But if you have a bit of a fresh ham that you’ve brined and baked, that’d go just beautifully.

Green Grits, Serves 4 to 6, Inspired by original recipe in Jamie’s America

2 c stock, chicken or vegetable, preferably homemade

2 c whole milk, Snowville, if it’s available in your area

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February 15, 2011

Snowville Creamery | Making Crème Fraiche

A little kitchen magic. After 24 hours, thick creme fraiche pours from the heavy cream container.

Slow Food Columbus recently held a free (yes! it was free!) workshop at the North Market as part of their taste education efforts.  It was so wonderful to see a room full of folks eager to learn how to make their own butter.   Warren Taylor, a.k.a., the Dairy Evangelist, lead the class and was a fireball of energy and information.  I learned the differences between the milk produced by the beautiful grass fed ladies Snowville cares for and the product from more intensive methods.  I learned about the difference between pasteurization and ultra high temperature (UHT) pasteurization (Why is UHT milk slightly sweet? Because it starts to caramelize at that high temperature. Eek).  Warren even convinced me to switch from skim to whole.  (I’ll move up to 2% first, but I’m doing it.)

But not only did I learn the difference between sweet cream and cultured cream butters (and made them) but I also learned something tremendous: how to make crème fraiche.  Oh yes.

Here’s how:

1 cup of cultured buttermilk

1/2 gallon heavy cream

Mix the two.  In Snowville’s carton, there’s enough room for you to add in the buttermilk and shake it to mix.  Let it sit on the counter for 24 hours.  Voilà ! Crème fraiche.  Refrigerate until ready to use.

Then to make cultured butter, pour some of this crème fraiche into a food processor (no higher than the liquid fill line) and flip on.  Process until the butter separates from the buttermilk (it will happen rather suddenly).  Using your hands squeeze out all the buttermilk from the butter (do this over a bowl and save that buttermilk for pancakes or coleslaw dressing), then rinse the butter under cold water until it runs clear (it keeps longer if you do this).

Fun fact: If you make butter from heavy cream, the liquid you press out is not buttermilk, it’s skim milk!  Who knew?

Keep an eye out for crème fraiche in tonight’s dinner.  It’s divine.

Thank you Warren Taylor.  We love Snowville.  We love your pasture grazed cows.  We love their fresh milk and the heavenly cream that rises to the top.

November 17, 2010

Rose-scented Basmati Rice Pudding | Ohh, Lah Lah!

It’s a dessert!  Readers with a sweet tooth, rejoice! 

I have yet to put one up on PK, although they’re made around here occasionally.  This one is dead simple.  Mostly because it starts with leftover Indian-spiced Basmati.  If you’ve been around the Kitchen much, you’ll remember how much I love curries.  For the pudding, I used the leftover rice that I had served with a delicate curry I made late last week.  That lovely rice will go with lots of dishes and it smells heavenly.  But really, you could probably use just about any plain-ish leftover rice.   Just don’t go using Uncle Ben’s Mushroom Explosion or anything like that.

This also gave me a chance to use the rest of my special Ohh, Lah Lah from the good folks at Snowville Creamery.  Snowville is working on developing a new product (Ohh, Lah Lah)  that is essentially 2% milk that’s been cold nano-filtered and reduced 2  1/2 times to make it thick and creamy.  It’s low-fat, but you’d never know it, it’s almost like cream.  It’s fabulous and not in stores yet so I squee’d when I got the chance to try it first.  This turned into a perfect use for it.  I ran out and need more already.  I have so many other ideas.  What do you say, Snowville?

And for bonus points, this dessert takes ten minutes, start to finish.

Indian Roses Rice Pudding, serves 6 to 8

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October 7, 2010

Snowville Creamery Ricotta

Remember how I said it was really easy to make butter?  It turns out that it’s also extremely easy to make cheese.  Fresh ricotta can be made at home in about ten minutes. 

There are a ton of recipes out there: ones that call for lemon, ones that call for vinegar, some that call for heavy cream, some that call for whole milk.  The method I used was to bring five cups of whole milk to a boil over medium high heat and stir in juice from a whole lemon.  I added two tablespoons of vinegar instead.  The milk split almost immediately.  Awesome!  I stirred a bit more and poured the cheese into a cheesecloth (what it’s actually for!!) lined colander over a bowl. 

I’ll let it drain in the fridge for another hour or two then use it in tonight’s vegetarian pasta dinner.

The non-local ingredient in this post was the vinegar.

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