Archive for ‘North Market’

February 16, 2012

Mix This | Georgian ‘Curry’ Mix

ImageIn Georgian cooking, Khmeli Suneli is a spice mix that can be used as a dry rub or as an enhancement to soups and stews. It is essentially a curry, since it’s just a mix of spices.  You can choose to use all dried ingredients, or include some fresh, if you have it or it’s in season.

I used this in a mixed braise with lamb and short ribs (expect a post about that soon).  But it would also be great mixed with some olive oil and bread crumbs as an herb crust on chicken or fish.  Or sprinkle in a heaping tablespoon once you’ve sweated down some onions as a base for soup.

It’s fragrant, beautiful stuff, with forgiving measurements.

Persephone’s Khmeli Suneli

Mix equal parts dried of (I used a tablespoon each):

Whole fenugreek seeds

Bay leaf (I used 2 huge ones)

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March 28, 2011

Earthy Elegance | Porcini Mushroom and Chicken Liver Pâté

I have been craving pâté for a couple of weeks.

This coming from the girl who couldn’t stand liver growing up.  But as times change, so do ingredients.  With such widespread availability from so many great producers, its a great time to revisit some of the things you thought you didn’t like.  You might be surprised.

It’s a craving that makes some sense.  Chicken livers are a powerhouse of iron as well as a slew of other minerals, and they have a high vitamin content too.  So if you’re feeling a little run down, do yourself a favor and find some high-quality livers.  These beautiful ones were from North Market Poultry and Game, because honestly, they have the best chickens in Columbus, and therefore the best livers.

I followed this recipe from Gordon Ramsay, because no matter how he acts on American television, this guy can cook.  And this recipe produced, rather simply, with just a few ingredients, something that was a serious treat to eat.  Served on some crispy toasts or small slices of fresh baguette, the pâté has an earthy, forest-like fragrance to it thanks to the porcini mushrooms and woodsy thyme.  It’s a dish that evokes luxury, but if you stop to think about it, it’s quite humble indeed.

A few PK tips if you decide to make this some Saturday.  If you’re here in Columbus, use Snowville‘s whole milk to soak the livers in overnight, it elevates the dish, I think.  And while you’re at it, just buy some of the whipping cream and fix up a quick batch of butter to clarify and pour over the top of the pâté to seal.  If you’re taking care, go all the way.  Take the time and press the pate through a sieve to ensure the mixture is silky.  When you taste it you will appreciate your own efforts.  When you’re ready to serve the pâté, take it out of the fridge a bit before you’re ready to serve it.  I marveled at how the flavors blossomed as it warmed from cool to room temperature, almost like a cheese.

Playlist included Teenage Suicide Don’t Do It by Big Fun.  There is a link there, believe it or not.

February 11, 2011

Simple Suppers | Hainanese Chicken Rice

This is perhaps one of the simplest recipes I’ve ever posted.  It is one that requires almost no effort when it comes to dinner time.  One that everyone in my family loves.  One that requires only a few ingredients and some spices. (Have you been building your spice cabinet?)  It has taken over as my favorite way to utilize a fresh, locally-raised speckled hen from North Market Poultry and Game.  I will suggest that you get the freshest chicken you can lay your hands on.  Pay a little bit more for the chicken than you think is reasonable.  Trust me that it will make a difference in this dish.  Because chicken rice is about two things: chicken and rice.  They need to be good.

The ease of this recipe is that the chicken is poached and then allowed to cool in the stock over several hours.  It’s also sometimes called white chicken.  Essentially, you cook it for 30 minutes in the morning and then when it’s time for dinner, make a pot of rice and gather some soy, vinegar and spices for your condiments.  Dinner can be on the table in fifteen minutes and is a symphony of Singapore flavors.

Ingredients: Ginger, whole chicken, rice, soy sauce, a green onion, vinegar, a spicy chili, coarse salt, Szechuan peppercorns, fresh cilantro.  Optional lettuce.

For the chicken:

Take a whole chicken, 3 to 4 pounds, and remove the giblets.  In a deep stock pot fill with enough water that will cover the chicken.  Into the water

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January 31, 2011

Obsession with Breakfast Continues | Chicken and Waffles

It seems to me that I’m going through a breakfast phase.  Eggs at most meals, bacon at dinner.  This is good for the winter.  It’s cold, it’s comforting to have maple syrup on the table.  It reminds you that the sap will be rising again soon, tapped by our friends the farmers.  Rising sap means spring can’t be too far off.  Tell that to the ice storm that’s supposed to be coming through tonight, but I digress from my pretty story.

Saturday morning, Cherub wanted waffles.  Being the loving, indulgent mother I am – don’t snicker derisively, you – I set to doing it right after a large cup of coffee away.  Curses that we were out of butter.  No matter, it seems.  Mr. James Beard himself says waffles are just delicious with bacon fat.  Well, certainly!  Now before you go shaking your head and saying, “How can a loving mother feed her child bacon fat!?!”  It’s really very easy.  You just don’t do it every day.

So a good batch of waffles were sitting in the fridge, leftover, insisting that something to be done with them.  Chicken and waffles is the obvious choice.  But I wasn’t about to serve fried chicken with those bacon-y waffles, although that would have been divine.  I opted for a lighter version, a pan seared chicken breast.

I do go for the bone in, skin on version, as it makes for a tastier, moister breast.  It’s easily de-boned before serving, takes all of about 15 seconds, really.  You have fifteen seconds, don’t you?  And if you want really, good, fresh chicken, stop by North Market Poultry and Game.  They have the very best here in Columbus, bar none.

The best way to cook a chicken breast (or two) is to season it generously with salt and pepper and sear it in a 10-inch pan that’s got some good (and hot) olive oil in it.  Let it brown very well, skin side down first, then flip it over and brown the other side as well.  Add in about a cup and a half of chicken stock, a sprig of thyme and a clove of crushed garlic, bring to a simmer and reduce the heat to cook fairly slowly, turning and basting the chicken until it’s done.  Twenty to thirty minutes or so should do the trick.  Also by this time, your stock should be just about reduced to nothing.  Snug up the curved sides of the breast to the sides of the pan to get a good last bit of browning on them then pull them out to rest a few moments while you toast the leftover waffles and heat up the syrup.

To serve, remove the bones from the chicken (and the skin if you must) and slice.  Place on top of the waffle.  Add a slice of bacon or two if you want some extra protein.  Drizzle generously with maple syrup and cross your fingers spring comes sooner rather than later.

Playlist included Radioactive by Kings of Leon.

December 23, 2010

Darkest Night of the Year | Truffled Root Vegetable Dauphinoise

I love the Greener Grocer.  You can find so many local things at the shop as well as the occasional rare treat from farther afield.  The most recent delicacy was a quarter pound of Oregon black truffles, which will feature prominently in our Christmas Eve and Christmas day meals.  But my favorite way to use them is in the humblest and simplest dishes where they can show off all their earthy fragrance.

For dinner, I cobbled together three things that were sitting in my crisper in need of quick use: a half of a celeriac, a half of a rutabaga and a half of an onion (from vegetable soup to atone for all my enchilada sins in Texas).  Looking across at the shelf with the dairy, I spied the half gallon of Snowville whipping cream (uh, yeah, sorry vegetable soup) that needed to be used, too.  Voila! Dauphinoise!  Normally a potato dish with cheese, I had a suspicion combining the root vegetables with the silky fat in the cream would make the truffle the star.  I love it when an idea comes together.

Truffled Celeriac Dauphinoise, Serves Four

1/4 large rutabega, very thinly sliced (use a mandolin if you’ve got one)

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December 21, 2010

Locavore Dessert | Caramelized Apple Cranachan

It’s snowy and cold here in Ohio.   Perfect Christmas weather.

But don’t let that weather preclude you from making something deliciously local and in season.  At the Greener Grocer in North Market, you can pick up the three or four ingredients you need for this simple, luscious dessert.  In fact, it makes a fantastic Christmas pudding because it’s dead simple.

This is a Scottish dessert.  And Scots know that when it’s cold, a wee bit of whisky will warm you up.  This cranachan is essentially whipped Snowville Cream mixed with local honey and a bit of good bourbon whiskey.  Do your level best not to eat the whole bowl straight.  Instead, this time of year, top with a sliced local apple  that’s been caramelized in a bit of butter and a sprinkling of toasted rolled oats or spelt.

Ohio River Valley Cranachan, Serves 4

2 apples, cored and thinly sliced (I used ones from Hirsch Farm)

2 T butter (you can make your own with Snowville)

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November 28, 2010

Giveaway of the Day | North Market Spices Gift

I love the folks at North Market Spices.  I love Ben.  I adore his mom, Cindy.  Cherub loves Cindy.  Loves, loves, loves.  You get tremendous service from the Walters family there.  They have everything you could possibly need.  Plus some things you might not have realized you need.  It’s a fun shop.

Right now they have mulling spices for wine as well as, I’ve heard, a tremendous spicy hocho (hot chocolate for all of you not into the whole brevity thing).  Great grab and go gift bags, too.  Perfect for the last-minute hostess gift.  Because we are all  being invited to a ton of holiday soirees this time of year.

So today’s giveaway from North Market Spices, Ltd. is perfect for giving or keeping.  This gift bag contains 2 ounces of mulling spices, 2.5 ounces of pumpkin spice and 2 ounces of poultry seasoning.  Also included is a “holiday topper” with whole nutmeg, cinnamon sticks and a cute mini grater that stores the nutmeg, perfect for grating over egg nog or a strong hot toddy. 

To enter, let me know who you plan to give this little gift to (yourself?  your mom?  your office mate?) in the comments section of this post or send me a tweet with the same info.  For complete rules, click here.  Entries can be submitted until noon on November 29th.  Good luck!

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