Posts tagged ‘Crème fraiche’

March 22, 2011

Three Ingredient Garnish | Avocado Lime Crema

A Saturday shopping trip to my favorite little Mexican grocery store turned up tortillas that rival many I’ve had in Texas, dried corn husks, great cheeses including cotija and Oaxaca, bulk beans, and avocados.

I’ve been kind of obsessed with avocados since reading this fantastic short article in Eating Well (helpfully compiled in Best Food Writing of 2010) about a tiny spot in the Mexican state of Michoacán that is perfectly suited to growing the best avocados in the world, year-round.

On Sunday, I was remiss in posting this three ingredient garnish (one of which is avocados, natch) that is delicious on spicy tacos, as a substitute for mayonnaise in chicken salads (I will be doing this a lot during the summer for sure) and perfect on, what else? huevos rancheros.  It is not guacamole: because it’s not spicy and it’s got crème fraîche in it.  Use it as a cooling counterpoint to hot and spicy foods.  Perhaps some chipotle wings… hmmm…

Avocado Lime Crema

Note the teeny tag that says it's from Michoacán.

1 ripe avocado (Haas are my favorites, choose one that gives a bit in your hand, but isn’t mushy – or alternately – hard as a rock)

1/2 c crème fraîche, or crema or sour cream

Zest and juice from 1/2 lime

Salt to taste

Scoop the avocado flesh into a food processor, add the crema, lime and salt and process until smooth.  Careful you don’t process too much- could this Snowville crème fraîche turn into butter?

Serve. Perhaps in the scooped out avocado hulls?

Playlist included Whirring, by The Joy Formidable.

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March 16, 2011

Irish Cooking | Poached Salmon on Brown Bread

It’s a marvelous, make ahead kind of a lunch.

Poach a bit of salmon the night before, bring along a slice of leftover pint bread, a tiny cup of homemade crème fraîche and add a few thin slices of onion, some fresh dill if you have it, a caper or two if you want.  It is perhaps one of the healthiest things you could take for lunch, plus it’s simple, and tastes luxurious.

PK tip: this assembles in moments.  Pack the salmon along with the dill and onion, but pack separately the crème fraîche and the bread.  Yet another thought: wouldn’t this also make fabulous little quick appetizers?

Your cube mates will be jealous.

 

 

February 16, 2011

Using Crème Fraiche | Quick and Gorgeous Spring Tart

It’s been in the 50s here in Columbus.  It makes me think spring is here.  So since it feels like Spring, I’m starting to cook like it.  This quick rosemary ham tart with only six ingredients, is one of the simplest things you can make.   It is beautiful for brunch, great for a light dinner, even amazing as part of a little buffet of appetizers at a cocktail party.  So flexible, too.  You could certainly sub some roasted spring asparagus for the ham if you were feeling virtuous.

And oh my is it addictively tasty.

Spring Rosemary Ham Tart, inspired by John Torode

1 piece frozen puff pastry, thawed

2 eggs

1/2 c crème fraiche (you can certainly buy it, if you haven’t the time to make it)

1 t good English mustard (prepared, not ground)

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February 15, 2011

Snowville Creamery | Making Crème Fraiche

A little kitchen magic. After 24 hours, thick creme fraiche pours from the heavy cream container.

Slow Food Columbus recently held a free (yes! it was free!) workshop at the North Market as part of their taste education efforts.  It was so wonderful to see a room full of folks eager to learn how to make their own butter.   Warren Taylor, a.k.a., the Dairy Evangelist, lead the class and was a fireball of energy and information.  I learned the differences between the milk produced by the beautiful grass fed ladies Snowville cares for and the product from more intensive methods.  I learned about the difference between pasteurization and ultra high temperature (UHT) pasteurization (Why is UHT milk slightly sweet? Because it starts to caramelize at that high temperature. Eek).  Warren even convinced me to switch from skim to whole.  (I’ll move up to 2% first, but I’m doing it.)

But not only did I learn the difference between sweet cream and cultured cream butters (and made them) but I also learned something tremendous: how to make crème fraiche.  Oh yes.

Here’s how:

1 cup of cultured buttermilk

1/2 gallon heavy cream

Mix the two.  In Snowville’s carton, there’s enough room for you to add in the buttermilk and shake it to mix.  Let it sit on the counter for 24 hours.  Voilà ! Crème fraiche.  Refrigerate until ready to use.

Then to make cultured butter, pour some of this crème fraiche into a food processor (no higher than the liquid fill line) and flip on.  Process until the butter separates from the buttermilk (it will happen rather suddenly).  Using your hands squeeze out all the buttermilk from the butter (do this over a bowl and save that buttermilk for pancakes or coleslaw dressing), then rinse the butter under cold water until it runs clear (it keeps longer if you do this).

Fun fact: If you make butter from heavy cream, the liquid you press out is not buttermilk, it’s skim milk!  Who knew?

Keep an eye out for crème fraiche in tonight’s dinner.  It’s divine.

Thank you Warren Taylor.  We love Snowville.  We love your pasture grazed cows.  We love their fresh milk and the heavenly cream that rises to the top.

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