Archive for ‘Mushrooms’

December 5, 2011

Early Winter Heaven | Turbot with Chanterelles and Melted Parsnips

Turbot has become my new favorite fish.  At first blush, it’s light, mild, and delicate.  But a heartbeat later you realize its meaty, dense, and packed with beautiful flavor.  Pair it with this seasonal and politely assertive sauce and you’ll really get your loved one’s attention on a cold December night.  Most importantly, the ingredients are familiar and the techniques are pretty basic.  It’s a can’t miss weeknight meal that’s quick, healthy, satisfying and elegant.  I can hardly believe something so simple could make such an impact.  It’s a beautiful dish.

Turbot is popular on European plates, but lately it seems to be making its presence known in American eateries and grocery stores as well.  If you can’t find it, ask your fishmonger.  The success of this meal is directly related to the quality of the ingredients.  Find the best mushrooms you can.  These were from the Greener Grocer and perfection.  This is a modified version of a dish found in Rick Stein’s Complete Seafood.  You must own this book.

Early Winter Turbot with Chanterelles and Melted Parsnips, serves 2

2/3 to 3/4 of a pound Turbot fillet

3 strips of bacon, thickly sliced

read more »

Advertisements
September 19, 2011

An Ohio Casserole Classic | Johnny Marzetti

Food trends come and go.  And ideas, ingredients, or dishes that you might think aren’t exactly cool, always seem to have a way of coming back around.  Being thrifty and using offal and off cuts is fashionable.  It’s hip to garden again.  The values of my Gran are suddenly in vogue.  How charming!

My friend John loves Columbus, loves food and thought it would be great to celebrate Johnny Marzetti with a collection of blog posts from local Columbus food bloggers.  I was so pleased to be included in the crowd and to learn about this dish, not being a Columbus native.  I assured John I’d never heard of or eaten this dish before.  But now what truly fascinates me is that there is a version that made its way to the Rio Grande valley of Texas, a stone’s throw away from where I grew up.   And as it turns out,  it’s something that my Grandma often made for Sunday dinners and potlucks.  I knew it as Macaroni Crunch, but many others knew it as Johnny Marzotti.  Maybe this is the sort of unspoken influence that food has on our lives.

Here’s my version of this Ohio and South Texas classic.  I’ve put my own spin on it by using heirloom tomatoes, fresh mushrooms and peppers from my back garden.  The result is a fresh take on the already entirely delicious French’s-fried-onions-canned-mushroom-soup-and-canned-tomato version with which I grew up.  And somehow, I think Grandma might be proud.  Proud of my garden and my thriftiness and my comfort in the kitchen.

read more »

April 12, 2011

Korean Short Ribs | Galbi Jijm

I’m always honored and humbled to cook food with such proud, venerable, even ancient roots.  Korean food is no exception.  Thousands of years of refinement has led to a breathtaking marriage of flavors.  This dish is a perfect example.  The sweet of the mirin joins the depth of the soy and the earthiness of the mushrooms for a bit of kitchen alchemy.  I compulsively tasted it as it simmered away, and I struggled to remember a more delicious sauce.  It was beautiful.

Again, its a recipe that takes a while, but there’s not a lot of hands-on time.  There are some moving parts at the end, but it is so – I repeat – so worth it.  It’s comforting, traditional, and special.  Those eating with you will feel loved.

Persephone’s Galbi Jijm

2 pounds of bone-in short rib

1 medium onion, roughly sliced

1 clove of garlic, diced

read more »

March 28, 2011

Earthy Elegance | Porcini Mushroom and Chicken Liver Pâté

I have been craving pâté for a couple of weeks.

This coming from the girl who couldn’t stand liver growing up.  But as times change, so do ingredients.  With such widespread availability from so many great producers, its a great time to revisit some of the things you thought you didn’t like.  You might be surprised.

It’s a craving that makes some sense.  Chicken livers are a powerhouse of iron as well as a slew of other minerals, and they have a high vitamin content too.  So if you’re feeling a little run down, do yourself a favor and find some high-quality livers.  These beautiful ones were from North Market Poultry and Game, because honestly, they have the best chickens in Columbus, and therefore the best livers.

I followed this recipe from Gordon Ramsay, because no matter how he acts on American television, this guy can cook.  And this recipe produced, rather simply, with just a few ingredients, something that was a serious treat to eat.  Served on some crispy toasts or small slices of fresh baguette, the pâté has an earthy, forest-like fragrance to it thanks to the porcini mushrooms and woodsy thyme.  It’s a dish that evokes luxury, but if you stop to think about it, it’s quite humble indeed.

A few PK tips if you decide to make this some Saturday.  If you’re here in Columbus, use Snowville‘s whole milk to soak the livers in overnight, it elevates the dish, I think.  And while you’re at it, just buy some of the whipping cream and fix up a quick batch of butter to clarify and pour over the top of the pâté to seal.  If you’re taking care, go all the way.  Take the time and press the pate through a sieve to ensure the mixture is silky.  When you taste it you will appreciate your own efforts.  When you’re ready to serve the pâté, take it out of the fridge a bit before you’re ready to serve it.  I marveled at how the flavors blossomed as it warmed from cool to room temperature, almost like a cheese.

Playlist included Teenage Suicide Don’t Do It by Big Fun.  There is a link there, believe it or not.

February 1, 2011

Two Minute Solution to Elevating Your Game | Dashi

We do a lot of Asian cooking here in Persephone’s Kitchen.  I’ve said before that I regularly whip up some version of a stir-fry noodle dish once a week.  I love them because they’re so fast and so delicious.  But I think I found a new secret weapon to really improving the flavor of my dishes.

Two ingredients that can be purchased not just at an Asian supermarket like Tensuke here in Columbus, but at Whole Foods: bonito flakes and kombu.  I know, these ingredients have been around, well, thousands of years.  But that such a simple solution to authentic flavor for my Japanese noodle dishes could be found so easily and took the addition of almost no time to dinner has just left me kind of giddy.  Yes, let’s all discuss it again: Persephone is such a nerd.  Laugh if you want, but dinner tonight took about 20 minutes and had a depth of flavor that was almost staggering.  So there.

Ichiban-Dashi with Salmon, Shrimp and Noodles, serves 2 to 3

1 six-inch piece of kombu

1/2 c bonito flakes

8 cups of water (although I used a lovely vegetable stock, water is just fine)

Soy sauce and Mirin to taste (about 5 T of soy and 3 of Mirin)

1 bundle of udon noodles (I have some that take 12 minutes, check your package, yours might take less time, add them in at the right time)

1/3 pound salmon

1/3 pound shrimp, peeled and deveined

1 carrot, peeled and sliced into thin batons

3 green onions, thinly sliced on the diagonal

1/4 c shiitake mushrooms, torn or sliced into small pieces

3 inch piece of daikon radish, peeled and sliced into thin batons

2  ribs of bok choy, thinly sliced

Sesame seed oil, optional

In wide, deep pan, add the water and the kombu.  Over medium heat, bring to a boil.  Add the bonito flakes.  Turn off the heat, let the flakes settle to the bottom of the pot.  Strain the solids and return to the same pan.  Add in the soy sauce and mirin.  Taste and adjust seasoning. Bring up to a nice low simmer: bubbles, but not boiling away like mad.  Set a timer for 12 minutes.  Add in the salmon and udon.  At ten, add the carrots.  At eight, add the green onions and mushrooms.  At six, add the bok choy ribs, reserving the leafy greens. At five, add the shrimp. At four, add the daikon and remove the salmon to remove the skin, if you have a piece with skin, and flake into large pieces.  Return to the pan.  At two, add in the green tops from the bok choy.  Simmer the rest of the time.  Taste for seasoning and add a bit more mirin or soy if you think it needs it.  I added a few drops of sesame seed oil just before serving.

Divide between bowls and slurp loudly.  It’s only polite.

Playlist included Wait Up (Boots of Danger), by Tokyo Police Club.

January 11, 2011

Winter Kitchen | Roasted Chestnut Risotto with Mushrooms

When the snow is swirling outside and you feel like spending a bit of time in a warm kitchen stirring leisurely, risotto is your answer.

I have a deep love for risottos.   It is an endlessly versatile dish, perfectly at home in any season.  A stock, some aromatics, and a bit of rice transforms into a bowl of comfort.

I have taken risotto on as the meal I would most like to perfect in my life.  Ultimately, I want mine to be able to stand up next to any Italian nonna’s.  Lofty dream, I know.   But it’s a life project.

One of the things that makes me almost endlessly sad is to see recipes for “risotto” that include copious amounts of butter or oil or cream.  Risotto should not be a excessively fatty dish.  It is, as I said, essentially stock and rice.  You add at the end a bit of Parmesan if you like, or alternately, depending on the combination of ingredients, a heaping tablespoon (at most) of perhaps some marscapone cheese (across four servings) .  The creaminess of the dish is almost entirely derived from the grains of rice giving up their starch.

Today’s risotto was a combination of roasted and chopped chestnuts, dried and fresh mushrooms and a lamb stock.  This happy combination was again facilitated by The Flavor Thesaurus.   I had lamb bones in the freezer from a roasted lamb shoulder, so it was easy to toss everything in a pot to simmer a stock in the afternoon.  A bit later on, I set a metal sieve over the pot and soaked some dried chanterelles to rehydrate them and add a further bit of meatiness to the stock.

When it was time for dinner, I sauteed some fresh mushrooms (a combination of oyster, portabella, and cremini) along with the rehydrated chanterelles that I chopped in a very hot pan with some olive oil and salt and pepper, almost like duxelles.  When these were brown, I put them in a bowl for later.  I added a sliced shallot to the pan, reduced the heat to medium and soften it a bit.  Then I added about a cup and a half of rice, cooked it for a minute then deglazed the pan with vermouth.  The rest of the cooking is almost identical to the recipes here and here.  I added in the mushrooms just before the last addition of the lamb stock to rewarm them.  PK tip:  Make sure you add a generous extra ladle full or two of stock just before serving.  You want it almost a bit too loose.  It sets up so quickly as you get it to the table and you want it to be spoon-able, not stiff.  The plate was garnished with a bit of thyme (lots in the stock) and grated Parmesan.

Playlist included Writing to Reach You, by Travis.

December 29, 2010

Soup of the Week | Chicken, Leek and Beech Mushroom

How do you make this soup?

Well, first you take a leek…

What can I say?  It’s a favorite around here.

Let me know if you want the recipe for this week’s lunch.

 

 

%d bloggers like this: