Archive for ‘Salad’

November 3, 2010

Locavore | Gretna and Strawberry Salad

Those local strawberries from Crum Strawberry Farm are all gone.  The same goes for the beautiful arugula and salad mix from Honeyrun Farm.  They both went quickly this week between Hades and I into this surprisingly seasonal salad that also features Blue Jacket Dairy‘s Gretna, a Halloumi-style cheese (so local! so delicious!).  Blue Jacket recommends that you slice the Gretna and brown it quickly on both sides in a hot frying pan.  But for this salad, I prefer to allow slices to completely melt and go all brown and thin and lacy, then spread it on a toasted piece of artisan bread.  The cheesy crispy toast is the perfect foil to the spicy arugula and the last of the sweet berries.

Gretna and Strawberry Salad, serves 2

10 to 12 medium strawberries, hulled and quartered

4 or 5 quarter-inch slices of Blue Jacket Dairy Gretna

2 slices of good quality artisan bread, toasted

2 very generous handfuls of mixed salad greens, including arugula

Olive oil, balsamic vinegar, honey, good quality French Dijon mustard, salt, pepper

Heat a small nonstick frying pan over medium heat; spread the slices of Gretna evenly in the pan.  Allow to melt completely flat and begin to brown and fry.  Divide the cheese between the two slices of toast and spread to coat evenly.  Return to the pan, cheese side down for a few second to brown a bit more if you like.

In a large salad bowl, mix four tablespoons of olive oil, one tablespoon of balsamic, one tablespoon of honey, one teaspoon Dijon mustard and salt and pepper to taste.  Add in the greens and toss to combine.  PK tip: don’t dress the salad too early, just before serving, no one likes wilty, soggy lettuce.  Divide between two large plates, top with the berries.  Snug up the cheesy toast along side the salad.  Say farewell to fall and summer.

Playlist included The Writer, by Ellie Goulding.

November 1, 2010

My Favorite Take Along Salad | Roasted Carrot and Beetroot

    

Really, I am almost beside myself when I’ve got the ingredients for this one.  I can’t take credit for the perfection of a pairing that is a cumin vinaigrette, roasted beets and carrots, crisp tortilla and French cheese.  Look to the amazing Hugh Acheson of 5&10 in Athens, Georgia for that.  Look to him and thank him.

This version is my very humble homage.  But one, that when I can, will eat four or five days in a row for lunch.  It’s that good, people.  If you’re worried about prepping something to take for lunch during the week, you can (as I do, think Sunday) roast all the veg on the first day and subsequently just warm them up and put them on top of the dressed greens with the cheese and tortilla.  You can fry your chips in advance, too, I think, if you keep them tightly sealed after you’ve let them cool.  Pack things separately and assemble just before you’re ready to dig in.  Think about how this is not your normal take along salad!  Heaven.    

Roasted Carrot and Beetroot Salad with Cumin Vinaigrette

Serves two

3 to 4 medium to large beets, peeled and cut into large chunks

4 large carrots, scrubbed and cut into large chunks

Olive Oil, salt, pepper

1 Tortilla (I’ve used both corn and flour, I like flour best right now)

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October 19, 2010

Cocktails at the Rossi with Maia

Maia and I enjoyed cocktails and dinner at The Rossi tonight.  Maia is rather worldly and has been just about everywhere in this fair city of ours.  I love that about her.  She can order with the pros.

I started with a Ohio Apple Pie cocktail with some Brothers Drake mead because I just recently tasted all their fall releases.  The Rossi is one of the swanky places that carries this fine stuff.  Nicolene, the creative barkeep at Rossi, pairs Brothers Drake Apple Pie mead with another local libation, OYO vodka, and finishes it off with a garnish of cinnamon and sugar.  Really nice pairing.

Maia had the Fletcher and Bligh with Ten Cane rum, key lime juice, some maraschino liqueur.  The beautifully presented martini glass is kissed with vanilla bean sugar and looks like a frosted winter present, albeit one of delicious alcohol.

Being from Texas, I can’t pass up an opportunity to try an enchilada in any form, and

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October 7, 2010

Warm Local Salad for a Crisp Fall Day

I love salads for lunch.  Not the dried iceberg-purple-cabbage-shredded-carrot kind.  Salads with some personality: seasonal vegetables and a well paired salad dressing are the bare minimum of requirements.  Today’s lunch was a take on an original recipe from Jamie Oliver.  God love that man for all he’s doing to change the way people eat. 

Since we had some beautiful purple bell peppers (love!!!) from Honeyrun Farm, it was easy to make them the star.  The peppers were paired with a mix of greens from Honeyrun, too, and that were dressed with a simple vinaigrette that was spiked with cumin.  

Warm Stuffed Peppers with Cumin Dressed Greens, Serves 2

2 small purple (or any color really) bell peppers, cored, seeds removed

1 large Roma tomato, chopped

Small handful of fresh parsley and basil, chopped

2 slices ten grain bread, toasted (or similar)

1 clove of garlic, paper removed

Three generous handfuls of fresh salad greens

Olive oil, salt and pepper, mustard, cumin, local honey

Heat oven to 350˚.  Mix 1/2 to 3/4 of the chopped tomato with the chopped herbs.  Reserving the rest for garnish.  Sprinkle mixture with salt, pepper and a drizzle of olive oil.   Stuff each pepper with half the tomato mixture, place in a baking dish and drizzle with a bit more olive oil and salt and pepper.  Bake for 25 minutes.

Toast the bread slices.  When done, give each slice of toast a quick rub with the garlic clove (toast acts as a nice grater).  Mix the dressing with two to three tablespoons oil to one tablespoon of vinegar, whisk in a teaspoon of vinegar, a heaping teaspoon of cumin, and a drizzle of local honey.  Salt and pepper to taste.  Dress the greens.

Plate as shown above.

The only non-local ingredients in this dish, were the olive oil, vinegar, mustard, salt and pepper.  For complete sourcing see the Farms and Producers page.

October 4, 2010

Weekday Apple Salad

I couldn’t help myself.  In light of Saturday’s article in the WSJ, saying bacon is singing its swan song, I defiantly made a tasty fall salad with bacon ends from Curly Tail Farm.  I can’t help it if it goes so well with fall apples from Gillogly Orchards and sharp cheddar from Ohio Farm Direct and a few spicy mustard greens from Honeyrun Farm.  I. just. can’t. help it.

Combine those ingredients in the quantities you like (I like lots of greens, lots of apples, a little bit of cheddar and a little bit more bacon).  Then dress it in a vinaigrette made from apple cider vinegar, Hays apple cider, olive oil, salt, pepper, and just a drop or two of sriracha.

Cherub ate a local version of mac and cheese: some of the leftover Mrs. Miller’s Homemade noodles from last night’s chicken, along with a quick bechamel (equal parts flour and butter in a small saucepan, heated until bubbly for a minute or two, then whisk in Snowville milk to make a sauce) then add in a few ounces of cheese mixing to melt.  Add noodles to sauce and voila!  Scratch mac and cheese in under ten minutes.

See the Farms and Producers page for complete sourcing.

October 2, 2010

Dinner, Day One: Fall Fest at Flying J Farm

Photo credit, Ely Brothers

 

Hades, Cherub and I headed to Johnstown this afternoon for some fun on the farm. Cherub enjoys chasing the chickens and enticing Jewel the farm dog to play fetch. 

Hades and I were looking forward to the organic, grass-fed beef burgers for which Farmer Jensen is famous. 

While once again it managed to rain when we were there (same as the Slow Food dinner back August), but the rain never seems to dampen anyone’s spirits when they’re there. Dinner was pot luck, so I brought along a green bean and tomato salad from all the produce loveliness we bought this morning. Original credit for this salad goes to Chef Brian Polcyn, cited in Ruhlman’s Soul of a Chef

This is an easy salad that is great for entertaining and for pot luck meals like this one.  And it could hardly be more local. 

Wishwell Green Bean Salad  

½ pound green beans, tipped and halved if too long (Wishwell Farms

3 oz bacon ends, chopped (from Curly Tail Farm

1 Roma tomato, sliced in strips the approximate size as the beans (Wishwell) 

1 yellow tomato, sliced in strips (Wishwell) 

1 very large green onion, sliced (from Northridge Organic Farm) 

Apple cider vinegar, grapeseed oil, salt and pepper 

In a large pot of heavily salted boiling water, cook the beans for 3 to 4 minutes, or until just done. Remove the beans from the water to a bowl of ice water to stop the cooking. 

Render the chopped bacon ends until crispy. Remove to a plate lined with a paper towel. Reserve the drippings. Yes. Do it. 

In a large bowl, combine the bacon fat, 1/8 c grapeseed oil, 1/8 apple cider vinegar and the salt and pepper. Whisk to combine. Add the beans (that have been drained and dried slightly), yellow and red tomatoes, green onion, and crispy bacon. Mix lightly to keep the tomatoes in strips. 

For more pictures of Slow Foods Columbus‘s Shake the Hand That Feeds You Dinner, check the Ely Brothers’ Facebook album.

October 2, 2010

OH So Good Omelette

The parent sized portion

 Today started off with a classic French bistro lunch made with entirely local ingredients.  This was after we ran out to The Hills Market, didn’t find what we’d hoped and then scurried through the Worthington Farmer’s Market, just under the bell.  Where we found just about all we’d hoped.  You’ve gotta get there pretty early to snag local leeks. 

I’ll be doing some linking this week in the posts, but tonight I’ll start a page with suppliers for the week. 

OH So Good Omelette 

2 to 3 tomatoes, chopped (ours were backyard tomatoes) 

1 t bacon drippings (ours was from Bluescreek Farm Meats) 

2 eggs (these were from Holistic Acres in Ashland) 

1 T finely chopped herbs (today it was tarragon, basil, parsley, from Cronus’s garden) 

¼ c shredded strong cheddar (from Ohio Farm Direct in Fredricktown) 

The cherub sized portion

 

In a small nonstick pan, cook the tomatoes over medium low heat until you are left with a thick paste.  Season with a bit of salt.  Remove from heat.  Melt the bacon drippings in a small nonstick pan over medium low heat.  Scramble the two eggs and mix in the herbs, whisking firmly to incorporate.  Pour the eggs into the pan, allow to firm slightly then pull the edges of egg toward the center of the pan, allowing the uncooked egg to run to the bottom of the pan.  Spread half the tomato mixture over the eggs, sprinkle with cheese.  Season with salt and pepper.  Reduce heat to low.  Allow eggs to set a bit more, then fold omelette in half.  Flip, if you’re feeling sassy.   

Serve with Honey Run Farms greens with fennel frond vinaigrette. For the vinaigrette mix 3 T grapeseed oil, 1 T red wine vinegar, 1 t mustard, 1 T finely chopped fresh fennel fronds, five twists of pepper, a pinch of salt and a drizzle of local honey.  Toss lettuces in the dressing and serve immediately. 

Playlist included Devo’s Fresh.  Of course.

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