Posts tagged ‘flying j farm’

March 17, 2012

It’s Not Just for St. Patrick’s | Scratch Corned Beef

When we visited our farmer friend Dick Jensen a few weeks ago for maple tapping, we picked up some of his lovingly raised and delicious grass-fed beef.  We blew through the short ribs (I still owe you some posts on those, two ways) but we also bought a brisket with the full intention of having it as corned beef.

And everyone loves it for St. Patrick’s Day.  But consider it as something you could make anytime.  It makes enough for leftovers for a couple of days.  Turn it into amazing sandwiches with a little Russian dressing and coleslaw.  Add some leftover potatoes that you par boiled and then roasted in fat and turn it into hash.  This is not your out of the can variety.

It’s worth the effort.

There is a bit of wiggle room just how long you choose to brine your brisket. 

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February 17, 2011

It’s Really Just An Excuse | Buttermilk Pancakes

So with all the crème fraiche lying around, I was bound to make some more butter, and with that comes the buttermilk and with that, well, Cherub wanted pancakes.  I can’t say no to her sweet little face.  Well, I can sometimes.  OK, a lot of times.  But today is a yes kind of day.  So fresh buttermilk pancakes for lunch?  You got it little sister.

And for me?  It’s really just an excuse to eat more butter.  Besides, Warren says it’s good for me.

Buttermilk Pancakes, inspired by James Beard’s recipe in American Cookery

2 c all-purpose flour

1 1/4 t baking soda

1 t salt

3 T sugar

2 c buttermilk (homemade, if you can)

3 eggs, seperated

2 t vanilla

1/4 c butter, melted

Whisk the flour, baking soda, salt and sugar together in a large bowl.  Whisk together the buttermilk, egg yolks and vanilla.  Add and mix well with the dry ingredients.  Beat in the butter and mix until smooth.  Beat the egg whites until they have stiff peaks, then fold into the batter gently.

Ladle the batter into a hot pan or griddle and cook until the edges of the pancake are just starting to dry, most of the bubbles on top have popped and the bottom is golden brown.  Flip and brown the other side.

Serve with all that Snowville Creamery butter and some good Ohio maple syrup.  Speaking of which, fresh batches of syrup will available March 5th at Flying J Farm at the annual Maple Sugaring event.  Bring the kids for a demonstration on how syrup is made and stay for a pancake lunch.

Playlist included Thirteen, by Big Star.

 

 

October 21, 2010

Pub Night: Steak Pie with Mushy Peas

We have a love for just about all things English in this house: Shaun and Ed, Brit rock, Liberty fabrics, English comedy (the original Office, please), Chelsea football, Stilton, the Queen, English gardens, and the concept of a “local.”  Give me some grass-fed beef and I’ll give you a pie.  I could have used some kidneys to throw in there, too.  Next time.  I like to serve that lovely pie with some mushy peas.  These peas are the easiest side dish of all time: two ingredients, one of which is frozen peas.  While I didn’t use marrowfat peas as a traditional recipe calls, a good organic frozen variety pinch hits nicely.  Add in a bit of English cheddar to the peas and you’re laughing. 

A PK tip: this is a great meal for a Saturday afternoon; you need time, but not much of it is hands on time.  Plus it goes very well with beer.

Who Ate All The (Meat) Pie?

For the Pie

2 pounds (grass-fed, organic) chuck roast, cut in large cubed, bones reserved

small handful baby leeks, chopped (or 1 small onion, or 1 large leek)

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October 13, 2010

Juniper Rubbed Sirloin with Balsamic Dressed Potatoes

Weeknight meals aren’t super complicated around here.  That doesn’t mean they have to be the same old boring flavors that make you want to tear your hair out.  Ok, maybe that’s just me that gets worked up like that.  But I digress.  Today I’m not going to give you so much of a recipe as

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October 4, 2010

Dinner, Day Three: Braised Short Ribs from Flying J Farm

I can’t tell you how much I love short ribs.  They’re cheap, they’re easy to prepare, and with a little forward planning, they’ll give you more flavor than cuts that are five times the price.  Unfortunately, they’re also terribly underutilized in the home kitchen.  Even if you aren’t that comfy in the kitchen, they are very forgiving.  So go ahead and keep your filets – this unsung cut is the one for me.

For this dish I used grass-fed short ribs from Flying J Farm, which were second to none.  They were dense and meaty, with just the right amount of fat for succulence.  And marvelously bordering on just a bit wild tasting because of the grass diet.  Just remember: low heat, long time, and you’ll have a smile on your face at the dinner table.

Braised Short Ribs with Red Pepper Gravy and Sweet Potato Mash

3 pounds of grass-fed, Flying J short ribs, or grass-fed if you’re not from Ohio

1 T of bacon fat (Curly Tail Farm)

2 green onions, roughly chopped

3 garlic cloves, diced

2 medium tomatoes, roughly chopped

2 medium red bell peppers

1 small, red, spicy chili

2 T of flour

3 cups of stock, 3 cups of water

Salt/pepper

To get started add a thwack (that would be a heaping tablespoon, more or less) of bacon fat to a large, heavy-lidded roasting pan.  Turn up the heat pretty high.  Generously salt and pepper the ribs, then add them to the pan, searing on both sides.  I must emphasize two points here: 1.  Sear them until they begin to brown, and 2.  Do this in batches so as not to crowd the pan.  I will repeat:  do not crowd the pan.  Stack your ribs on a plate and set them aside.

Turn the heat way down, and add the onion, the chili, and the garlic.  Scrape the bottom of the pan somewhat obsessively to release all that goodness.  When soft, then add the peppers and tomatoes, and soften them somewhat.  Then put the ribs back in, along with any juices on the plate.  With flair, sprinkle everything with the flour, then add the liquid.

PK Tip:  After last night’s Chicken dish, we had leftover bones.  While cleaning up, I put them in a pasta pot, filled it with water along with some vegetable trimmings (like leek tops, carrot tops, radish tops, the odd tomato), bay, thyme and peppercorns, brought it to a boil, and simmered over low heat for 45 minutes.  Voila…stock.  In all honesty, if at this stage you don’t have stock made this way (or something similar), I would say just use all water and not a boxed stock.

Back to the show:  Place the lid on the pot and place in the oven at 300˚.  Two and a half hours is an absolute minimum.  Three is better, Four better still.  When it’s done, pull out the bones (won’t be hard – and save them!  That’s beef stock!), skim/remove any fat, and pull the meat apart with two forks.  Lovely.

Meanwhile, you’ll have plenty of time to make the sweet potato mash.  That’s one mammoth Beauregard sweet potato (thank you Northridge Organics), cubed, boiled, drained and mashed.  Add heavy cream, milk, salt and pepper to taste.  At the risk of repeating myself, lovely.  If you’ve got some fresh corriander (that’s cilantro), chop it and sprinkle it over the top, it’s fantastic.

According to James Beard, short ribs are best served with beer.  As a rule, you should never, ever disagree with James Beard.  So Columbus Brewing Company’s Scottish Ale it was.

Playlist included Bloodbuzz Ohio, by The National.  God, I love his voice.

Complete sourcing for local produce used in this meal can be found on the Farms and Producers page.

October 2, 2010

Dinner, Day One: Fall Fest at Flying J Farm

Photo credit, Ely Brothers

 

Hades, Cherub and I headed to Johnstown this afternoon for some fun on the farm. Cherub enjoys chasing the chickens and enticing Jewel the farm dog to play fetch. 

Hades and I were looking forward to the organic, grass-fed beef burgers for which Farmer Jensen is famous. 

While once again it managed to rain when we were there (same as the Slow Food dinner back August), but the rain never seems to dampen anyone’s spirits when they’re there. Dinner was pot luck, so I brought along a green bean and tomato salad from all the produce loveliness we bought this morning. Original credit for this salad goes to Chef Brian Polcyn, cited in Ruhlman’s Soul of a Chef

This is an easy salad that is great for entertaining and for pot luck meals like this one.  And it could hardly be more local. 

Wishwell Green Bean Salad  

½ pound green beans, tipped and halved if too long (Wishwell Farms

3 oz bacon ends, chopped (from Curly Tail Farm

1 Roma tomato, sliced in strips the approximate size as the beans (Wishwell) 

1 yellow tomato, sliced in strips (Wishwell) 

1 very large green onion, sliced (from Northridge Organic Farm) 

Apple cider vinegar, grapeseed oil, salt and pepper 

In a large pot of heavily salted boiling water, cook the beans for 3 to 4 minutes, or until just done. Remove the beans from the water to a bowl of ice water to stop the cooking. 

Render the chopped bacon ends until crispy. Remove to a plate lined with a paper towel. Reserve the drippings. Yes. Do it. 

In a large bowl, combine the bacon fat, 1/8 c grapeseed oil, 1/8 apple cider vinegar and the salt and pepper. Whisk to combine. Add the beans (that have been drained and dried slightly), yellow and red tomatoes, green onion, and crispy bacon. Mix lightly to keep the tomatoes in strips. 

For more pictures of Slow Foods Columbus‘s Shake the Hand That Feeds You Dinner, check the Ely Brothers’ Facebook album.

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